Samsung Go

Samsung Go
Designed by Japanese artist Naoto Fukasawa, the rounded and smooth edges of the Samsung Go work with the textured and rubberized surface to help create a stand-out design that easily makes this one of the better looking netbooks on the market. Available in 4 colours the Go features much of what you would expect including a 10.1-inch LED-backlit 1024 x 600 screen, 1.6 GHz Intel Atom processor, 160 GB hard drive, 1 GB of RAM, Intel graphics, Wi-Fi, a 1.3-megapixel integrated webcam and an integrated memory card reader. The 9 hour battery life should allow you to work during most flights. And to think I used to lug around a heavy laptop when I was traveling – what a nice change.
Samsung Go


A Litl netbook

A Litl netbook
A new netbook ideally suited for those living and working within an urban network topology that supports always on connections. If your mobile lifestyle means computing in your kitchen and then moving to your living room than this may be of interest to you.

Litl is an innovative new web computer, or webbook, that marries the communication functions of a laptop and TV. Small, portable, and equally at home on a kitchen countertop or a living-room coffee table, the webbook is designed for families with multiple users who like to keep in touch and socialize. Litl is always connected to the web (with access to Wi-Fi) and flips upright like an easel for TV-like viewing of photos and video. It has no hard drive, files or applications of its own, but instead runs on the “cloud,” using web-based applications like webmail, Google, Flickr and Facebook.

What interests me most is the UI which is more akin to appliance, iPhone, or WebOS — forget Windows 7, this is the kind of interfaces devices like this should have or the kind that companies should be at least exploring. The interface work was done with the assistance of Pentagram.
Unfortunately the Litl at $700 feels overpriced.
A Litl netbook


Sony Vaio W

Sony Vaio W
When netbooks first appeared the choice was simple- the Asus Eee. While the Asus had it’s fans, I found it less than inspiring and couldn’t imagine it standing up to the rigors of daily use. It didn’t look very good either. Since growing in popularity an increasing number of manufacturers have begun producing their own netbooks, and the quality and design of these mini-laptops has improved dramatically. More choice generally makes for harder decision so now that I am interested it’s tough to settle on one model. Sony may have made it easier.
Their recently introduced Sony Vaio Mini W feature an Intel Atom 1.66GHz processor, a 160GB hard drive, 1GB of DDR2 RAM, Bluetooth, MemoryStick / SD card reader, and 802.11b/g/n WiFi. The 10.1-inch LED screen has a higher than normal resolution of 1366 x 768 pixel, which may save you some horizontal scrolling on some sites. Unfortunately the battery life is reportedly only 3hrs which may be a deal breaker.
Sony Vaio Mini W


Yubz USB Skype Phones

Yubz USB Skype Phones
These aren’t new but they are interesting in that they focus on what feels and works well. I doubt replicating the quality of the original analogue phones that these phones have as a source of inspiration was their original intent but they are designed to be ergonomic and user friendly. I think products like these are a statement that not all new forms are an improvement.
The Yubz talk online series works without the need for a software install, comes in 4 vivid colors (Jet black, Alpine White, Russian Red, Lemon Yellow) and works with either a PC or a MAC. The focus of the product would be software like Skype but I assume it would work with most voip software.
Yubz USB Skype Phones


Palm pre

Palm pre
An exciting phone, at least in the demos, which makes it a worthy alternative to the iPhone or Android device for the jet-setter.
The Palm Pre features Palm proprietary webOS, which utilizes an interesting card based metaphor, and boasts a 3.1-inch touch screen with a gesture bar below, a full slide-out QWERTY keyboard, 8GB of storage, Wi-Fi/Bluetooth/GPS, and a 3-megapixel camera with flash. I think one of the interesting things about this phone is just how central a role the internet plays in the operating system. The way it pulls data from various web services, and melds it into its own framework is very promising. Apple and Android do the same to a degree, but with only there own proprietary networks. I do wonder why we would expect these web apps. to be any better than web apps. optimised for the iPhone, a strategy that directed allot of criticism towards Apple.
Watch a pre UI demo here and find more info. here.


Loop memory drive

Loop memory drive
It’s not the most capacious nor advanced but it does excel at it’s intended use.

Technology comes full circle. A simple geometric shape adds fun and function to this 2Gb USB travel drive. The lanyard and bold shape ensure that it won’t get lost amid your other travel accessories. The sealed plastic shell is durable and easy to clean, and the cleverly-designed shape creates a substantial spot for holding, inserting and removing.

Loop memory drive


Sony Ericsson Aspen

Sony Ericsson Aspen
It’s the form factor that really attracts me to the Aspen. It has a tight, solid design which will help you blend in with your Blackberry and E-series toting brethren. It has all the features one would expect including microSD storage, a full QWERTY keyboard, a 2.4” screen with Touch UI, aGPS, Wi-Fi, a 3.2 megapixel camera, and Microsoft Office Mobile. The Aspen is part of Sony Ericsson’s GreenHeart line, which is about reducing the negative impact on the environment. This is a good thing and might make their customers feel good about disposing their old phones in a landfill in order to purchase this one. Windows mobile like Symbian s60 is pretty much on life support at this point, but for those people who just want to connect to their office, message and get on with their day what does it really matter. Worth a look.
Sony Ericsson Aspen


Sony Ericsson Vivaz

Sony Ericsson Vivaz
The Vivaz is their latest media-centric device and it has some pretty impressive features, including a HD-capable, 8.1 megapixel camera that can capture 720p video. To store all that imagery the phone includes 8GBs of storage and integrated sharing to your Facebook and Youtube accounts. The Vivaz also has a 3.2” screen with Touch UI, aGPS, a browser based on Webkit and a plethora of other features you would expect from a phone of this class. Though I’ve learned the hard way that a laundry list of features does not a good phone make (I’m talking to you Nokia), the Vivaz is worth a look for those wanting to take high quality imagery on their phone.
Sony Ericsson Vivaz


Amazon Kindle 2 International edition

Amazon Kindle 2 International edition
Amazon’s Kindle 2 is now available in an international variant for an additional $20 above the base price making this e-reader a viable option for travelers. The good? You now have the ability to download e-books in the US and over 100 countries around the world. The bad? When downloading internationally each book costs an additional $1.99. Still I’m pretty excited about the possibility of finally being able to have access to a boat load of reading material while traveling around Asia. Now if only Amazon would provide native pdf support, going through the hassle of converting pdf is arcane.
Kindle Wireless Reading Device